Bloom Day~ look, then look closer

An Indiana garden blogger, Carol of  May Dreams Gardens, hosts a “Bloom Day” each month and invites bloggers everywhere to share what’s blooming in their gardens; this is my first time to take part, and I’m a day late in posting. 

Taking time to look….then look closer…..was time well spent for me~  thank you, Carol, for the inspiration and invitation!

 

A look (above) at a mixed container with tall Russian Sage Mexican bush sage /Salvia leucantha.  I like the natural upright, leggy look of it - this container isn’t showy, but I appreciate its honesty.

A closer look at the fuzzy pods.

A look at the super hardy Red Yucca….actually in the Agave family I read recently at LaptopGardener.com 

A closer look at the forming bloom.

A look at the Heartleaf Ice Plant~ just again blooming in November after September’s serious chomping by a deer; a pointy agave now stands guard next to this pot to detere deer.

 I didn’t include all my blooms – like the 5′ and still showy Mexican Petunias or the still going strong Plumbago.  They’ll surely not be blooming for the next Bloom Day in December, but then again….around here one never knows. 

12 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Julie
    Nov 16, 2011 @ 13:37:17

    I love the heartleaf ice plant–lovely! And I agree–the pot with the Russian Sage is beautiful. Happy GBBD!

    Reply

  2. Shirley
    Nov 16, 2011 @ 15:36:46

    Nice blooms, pretty vignette on your new steps too.

    Reply

  3. www.rockrose.blogspot.com
    Nov 16, 2011 @ 16:09:10

    I am taking a closer look as you say and unless your Russian sage is a completely different variety from the one I have I think it might be Salvia leucantha. My Russian sage has toothed leaves whereas the leucantha has smooth leaves.I you love the heartleaf ice plant. Looks wonderful trailing over the sides of a pot. I always make cuttings to keep over the winter. I would also question the people where you bought that Festuca glauca. Sure looks like Melinus neviglumis to me. When the seed head opens it will be easy to tell. My festuca has very insignificant blooms. Melinus, a showy pink seed head.
    Hope you had a happy bloom day.

    Reply

    • cyndik
      Nov 16, 2011 @ 17:20:00

      I’m glad you took a closer look, Jenny~ the plant was a gift from a friend who said she *thought* it was Russian Sage- I looked for an image at one time and found something that made me think she was probably right….but I’m not surprised at all that it’s not. I’ll look into identifying it; thank you much for the clues!

      Reply

      • cyndik
        Nov 16, 2011 @ 17:24:26

        Okay, just did an image search – now that I know what to look for….and yes, clearly this is Salvia leucantha / Mexican bush sage. Thanks again, Jenny~

  4. Caroline Homer
    Nov 16, 2011 @ 19:40:18

    Love those red pots! I keep meaning to get some ice plant — thanks for the reminder!

    Reply

  5. Brad
    Nov 16, 2011 @ 20:25:59

    SO Beautiful. I am going to look into a backyard makeover in the Spring and follow your example. I absolutely love it all!

    Reply

    • cyndik
      Nov 17, 2011 @ 05:28:15

      Thank you for stopping by, Brad, and for the compliment. By my “example” I guess you mean water-wise and less grass? Highly recommend it!
      I’m eager to visit the Crystal Bridges Museum in Bentonville sometime this year – I wonder if you’re planning a visit there? So fabulous that your Arkansas is now on the frontline of American art.

      Reply

  6. Tina
    Nov 17, 2011 @ 07:38:18

    I have some of the Ice Plant as well–I pinched several strands from a plant at my father’s home last spring, stuck them directly into two hanging baskets, kept them moist (or tried to) all summer and they’ve grown and bloomed for months! A terrific container plant.

    Reply

  7. Scott Weber
    Nov 17, 2011 @ 11:14:29

    Lovely post…I may have to consider adding the Red Yucca to my garden next year :-)

    Reply

    • cyndik
      Nov 17, 2011 @ 11:55:38

      Thanks for stopping by, Scott~ Red yuccas are “nice” and TX hardy….but why, when you have so many fabulous choices for what will thrive under your green thumb in lovely Oregon. Seriously.

      Reply

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